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Friday, July 24, 2020 | History

6 edition of Jewish & Christian mysticism found in the catalog.

Jewish & Christian mysticism

an introduction

by Dan Cohn-Sherbok

  • 283 Want to read
  • 26 Currently reading

Published by Continuum in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Mysticism -- Judaism -- History,
  • Mysticism -- History

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 173-174) and index.

    Other titlesJewish and Christian mysticism
    StatementDan Cohn-Sherbok & Lavinia Cohn-Sherbok.
    ContributionsCohn-Sherbok, Lavinia.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsBM723 .C64 1994
    The Physical Object
    Paginationviii, 186 p. ;
    Number of Pages186
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL1132155M
    ISBN 100826406955
    LC Control Number94079113

    Did Jewish throne mysticism, the so-called 'merkabah mysticism', influence the emergence and formation of the earliest exaltation Christology? The author presents resurrection Christology as a part of Jewish Christian merkabah tradition. Christ's exaltation was described as a heavenly journey that culminated in his enthronement on the divine throne of glory. Mysticism by Evelyn Underhill [] The classic study of the path to oneness, written by a leading student of Mysticism. Mysticism, Christian and Buddhist by Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki.[, not renewed]Suzuki compares and contrasts Buddhism with Meister Eckhart's mystical outlook.

    By the 13th century, Jewish culture was ripe for a new breed of mysticism to flourish. Around , a Spanish Jew named Moses de Leon penned and began circulating the first copies of the Kabbalah’s most famous book, the Zohar (Book of Splendor) in northern Castile.   One book, William Johnston's, The Still Point: Reflection on Zen and Christian Mysticism, was authored by an Irish Jesuit who taught at Sophia University in Japan and did lengthy dialogue with.

    Christianity - Christianity - Christian mysticism: Mysticism is the sense of some form of contact with the divine or transcendent, often understood in Christian tradition as involving union with God. Mysticism played an important role in the history of Christian religion and emerged as a living influence in modern times. Scholars have studied mysticism from many perspectives, . Christian mysticism, like Jewish and Islamic mysticism, has always implied the transformation of the sexual energy of er~s as a way of attaining God. Indeed, we might say that erotic transformation is even more important in Christianity in so far as Christian mystics conceive of God as the love who is Size: KB.


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Jewish & Christian mysticism by Dan Cohn-Sherbok Download PDF EPUB FB2

Jewish & Christian Mysticism: An Introduction Hardcover – January 1, by Dan Cohn-Sherbok (Author)Cited by: 2. The Rape of Jewish Mysticism by Christian Theologians is the extraordinary story of how, from the fourteenth century on, Christian theologians used the essence of Jewish mysticism to prove the divinity of Christ and how that effort resulted in Christian Kabbalah, in Rosicrucianism, and in all aspects of the Western occult movement as it is known today/5(7).

Books shelved as jewish-mysticism: The Essential Kabbalah: The Heart of Jewish Mysticism by Daniel C. Matt, The Encyclopedia of Jewish Myth, Magic and My. A substantial introduction to the study of early Jewish and Christian mysticism, this volume examines major aspects Jewish & Christian mysticism book the mystical tradition within early Judaism and Christianity.

This tradition was centered on the belief that a person directly, immediately, and before death can experience the divine, either as a rapture experience or one solicited by a particular praxis.

Christianity - Christian mysticism | ticular Christian mysticism. In the English-speaking world, she was one of the most widely read writers on such matters in the first half of the twentieth century.

No other book of its type — until the appearance in of Aldous Huxley's The Perennial Philosophy — met with success to match that of her best-known work, Mysticism, published in File Size: KB.

Jewish Roots of Eastern Christian Mysticism. The interdisciplinary seminar on the Jewish Roots of Eastern Christian Mysticism is designed as the internet version of an ongoing research seminar of graduate students at the department of theology of Marquette University (Milwaukee, USA).

4 the Qumran literature,5 and possibly in the teachings of the Palestinian Jewish school of Yohanan ben Zakkai.6 There are a growing number of scholars, myself included, who think that these early currents of mysticism form the basis for Merkavah and Hekhalot speculation.7 Subsequently, these mystical traditions were absorbed into the Pharisaic and Tannaitic.

Get this from a library. Jewish & Christian mysticism: an introduction. [Dan Cohn-Sherbok, Rabbiner Judaist USA; Lavinia Cohn-Sherbok]. In contemporary Judaism, the only main forms of Jewish mysticism followed are esoteric Lurianic Kabbalah and its later commentaries, the variety of schools in Hasidic Judaism, and Neo-Hasidism (incorporating Neo-Kabbalah) in non-Orthodox Jewish denominations.

viii An Introduction to Christian Mysticism has set a high standard with his editions of Merton’s novitiate notes Cassian and the Fathers () and Pre-Benedictine Monasti- cism (), and we are now in his debt with An Introduction to Christian Mysticism. We might begin by noting that in the early s a wide.

He wrote three Hebrew manuscript volumes detailing the numerous parallels he found between the New Testament and the Zohar (the classic core text of Jewish mysticism). Yochannan Rittangel (d. ), the first translator of the Jewish mystical work Sefer Yetzirah, was one of several Jewish believers in Yeshua to disseminate Jewish mystical.

Page xiii - JAOS Journal of the American Oriental Society JBL Journal of Biblical Literature JCS Journal of Cuneiform Studies JJS Journal of Jewish Studies JNES Journal of Near Eastern Studies Page 13 - And they saw the God of Israel: and there was under his feet, as it were, a paved work of a sapphire stone.

The Fourth Gospel calls on the faithful to believe that Jesus achieved ‘the mystical oneness with the God who is the source of life.’” “In his 24th book, The Fourth Gospel: Tales of a Jewish Mystic, the always provocative Bishop John Shelby Spong takes on the Gospel of John, opening new windows of insight and challenging the ways the Format: Ebook.

An Introduction to the Kabbalah Kabbalah can be translated from the Hebrew as "received tradition", and is a term applied to a vast and seemingly disparate body of esoteric knowledge and practice.

It is used to describe Jewish mysticism in general, or more specifically the tradition which found its impetus in the Sefer ha-ZoharFile Size: 98KB. Some traditional Jews take mysticism very seriously. Mysticism is an integral part of Chasidic Judaism, for example, and passages from kabbalistic sources are routinely included in traditional prayer books.

Other traditional Jews take mysticism with a grain of salt. One prominent Orthodox Jew. Early Christian Mysticism. Origen. The Desert Fathers. Evagrius Ponticus and John Cassian. Augustine and Gregory of Nyssa. Pseudo-Dionysius and Maximus Confessor Medieval Christian Mysticism.

Other Titles: Jewish and Christian mysticism: Responsibility: Dan Cohn-Sherbok & Lavinia Cohn-Sherbok. Jewish Mysticism: An Introduction fills a long-standing gap in the available literature.

Readers will find this accessible introduction reliably informed and authoritative. Avoiding the pitfalls common to other popular works in this fascinating field, it provides a thorough grounding in the subject and offers helpful pointers for further : The latter book gives a detailed account of each day of creation, embellishing the narrative found in Genesis 1 with, among other things, a description of God’s residence in the “upper worlds.” Sefer Yetzirah is a brief book that had an enormous influence on future Jewish mysticism.

However he is very clear that the Gospel of John is overwhelmingly a Jewish work and it can only be understood through the Jewish context in which it was created.

Spong writes “My study has convinced me, first, that the gospel of John is a deeply Jewish book, and second, that by reading it through the lens of Jewish mysticism, our generation. Jewish and Christian Mystic is An I1ltroduction What is the nature of mysticism in Judaism and Christianity? In this pioneering book Dan and Lavinia Cohn-Sherbok trace the evolution of mystical thought in both traditions from the post­ biblical era to the present day.

Among the many Jewish writings the authors discuss are the earliest.fulfillment. The early Jewish mystics did not even have a concept such as “mysticism” and never thought their experiences so abnormal as to require a special term.

Indeed Hebrew has no word for the mystical experience.6 The texts in this book, taken from different eras, illustrate five different categories of Jewish mysticism.Explore our list of Mysticism - Christian Books at Barnes & Noble®. Receive FREE shipping with your Barnes & Noble Membership.

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